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A Beginners Guide to Growing an African American Child’s Hair (by a Mom Who’s Doing It) – Pt. 1: Hair Types

guide-to-growing-african-american-child-hair
 

little-girl-natural-hair-journey v2If you ask any popular search engine, caring, maintaining, and growing an African-American baby’s hair is a mystery. You’ll get a menagerie of articles outlining general maintenance, but not very many online outlets directly address the delicate strands that make up a normal African-American child’s head of hair, or what it is you’re supposed to do exactly to keep those delicate strands healthy and prime for growth.

I went for months without really knowing what exactly I was dealing with on top of my little girl’s head. I knew her texture was different from mine. Her hair was softer, and curled into these perfect little spirals when wet – Nothing like my full head of tight, exquisite, “ziggly” coils.

Related Content: Brown Baby Hair Diaries – An African American Baby’s Hair Journey

I trucked along, throwing braids in her hair here and ponytails in her hair there – sometimes even snapping a comb through her delicate tresses.  It wasn’t until she began to show signs of breakage did I begin to do some hard core research on African-American hair and what exactly made it tick. What I learned led me on an amazing journey of hair discovery and personal growth.

Before you can begin to take care of your little brown baby’s hair properly and prime it for growth, there are two things you must understand. One: moisture is the key to EVERYTHING. African American’s hair, in general, WILL NOT grow without it; but we’ll get to that later. The second thing (and this is only my opinion based on experience) is that you must have a basic understanding of your child’s particular hair type. Without this knowledge, you’ll be hard-pressed to find a hair care regimen that will make your baby’s hair grow.

Related Content: 8 Tips, Tricks, and Cheats to Help You Care for Your African American Baby’s Hair

What works on your cotton soft, wavy tresses may not work on your baby’s head of constantly dry, zig-zag-like “curls”. Knowing, or at least having a general idea of, how each hair type reacts to certain products is a must.

Below you’ll find a texture “typing” system that the majority of “curlys” live by. It was designed by the super-fabulous celebrity hair stylist Andre Walker (This is the guy who does OPRAH’s hair.) and adapted by, one of my all time favorite natural hair websites, NaturallyCurly.com.[I'm excluding the Type 2 curlys in this list; so if you'd like more information on looser hair types, head here.]

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There’s more! >>

Click here for detailed descriptions of the above hair types (with recommended hair products for each type) along with other African American child hair care resources!

 

Click here for part 2 in the “How to Grow” series!

 

 

Author: Kesha of We Got Kidz

Kesha Chisholm Phillips is currently a part time graphic artist and the full time writer and editor of WeGotKidz.com and WeGotKidzGraphics.com. You'll find her all around the web sharing her parenting journey which includes everything from hilarious family videos to her refreshing takes on what it means to raise children today. Kesha currently resides in Atlanta, GA with her lovely husband and twins AJ and Jax.

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